Tuesday, July 23, 2019

These are short extracts from the reminiscences of MM about life on the farms in this area in the 1920s, 1930s and 1940s.  MM was born in 1917, and was 81 at the time of this recording.  On the extracts you will hear MM, with interjections from her son, DM, and the interviewer INT.

A transcript is given for each extract, one exactly as it was spoken, in the local dialect, and one in standard English.

FOOD

 INT:  What was the typical menu for the day ?

MM:  Well it was soup, and when we come from the school, ma mother aye had the pot setting  and we could tak soup when we come hame.  But we had cocoa at the school.  I think it was tuppence a week we paid and we got cocoa, ken, the janitor made the hot water, he did the water for us, but we' d to take wur ane piece, but I think it was tuppence we got.

INT:  And what about breakfast ?

MM:  Well, it was porridge I think we got, at hame, aye, and of course ma mother working, we'd all wur jobs to do 'fore we went to the school. Well we had ta mak the beds and kinda clean, do the dishes.  Betty and me was aye fighting aboot that, over jobs, aye, and then we'd set off for the school, you ken.  We'd a mile and a half to walk to Blair, to the school. Aye.


Translation into standard English


INT:   What was the typical menu for the day ?

MM:  Well it was soup, and when we came from school, my mother always had the pot setting and we could have soup when we came home.  But we had cocoa at the school.  I think it was tuppence a week we paid and we got cocoa, you know, the janitor made the hot water, he did the water for us, but we had to take our own sandwich, but I think it was tuppence we got.

INT:  And what about breakfast ?

MM:  Well, it was porridge I think we got, at home, yes, and of course my mother working, we'd all our jobs to do before we went to school. Well we had to make the beds and kind of clean, doing dishes.  Betty and I were always fighting about that, over jobs, yes, and then we'd set off for school, you know.  We had a mile and a half to walk to Blair, to the school. Yes.

Entertainment and Church Going

INT:  So what did you do at night then, when it was dark ?

MM:  We used to play cards and that, jest, ken, rummy cards and that.  And ma father eventually bought a radio, I can mind that.  And we got this six o'clock news, and  a Saturday night we got the McFlannels, you mind, and Scottish dance music.  And of course it was jest these accumulators, and we used to get em fra West, in Coupar Angus. They collected them and charged them, you ken, and ma father was that economical wi' it, you know, that was aboot all we got, was the six o'clock news, and a Saturday night we got this McFlannels and the Scottish dance music !  Aye. Aye.

INT:  What else did you do for sort of social activities, did you have the Sunday School, or …

MM:  Aye, well, we went to Sunday School.  Ma father went to the kirk, and we went up with him.  The first time ever I went to the kirk, Anne, ma mother had this one, you ken, hats, ken the velour hats, bought hat, and a coat, and cos I sees this mannie takin his hat off and here's me whips ma hat off.  And father says 'Keep your hat on!'   I thought you had to tak your hat off !


Translation into standard English

INT:  So what did you do at night then, when it was dark ?

MM:  We used to play cards and that, just, you know, rummy cards and that.  And my father eventually bought a radio.  I can remember that, and we got this six o'clock news, and on Saturday night we got the McFlannels, you remember, and Scottish dance music.  And of course it was just these accumulators, and we used to get them from West, in Coupar Angus. They collected them and charged them, you know, and my father was that economical with it, you know, that was about all we got, was the six o'clock news, and on Saturday night we got this McFlannels and the Scottish dance music !  Yes.  Yes.

INT:  What else did you do for sort of social activities, did you have the Sunday School, or …

MM:  Yes, well, we went to Sunday School.  My father went to the church, and we went up with him.  The first time I ever went to the church, Anne, my mother had these, you know, hats, you know the velour hats, bought hat, and a coat, and because I saw this man taking his hat off and here's me whips my hat off.   And father says 'Keep your hat on!'  I thought you had to take your hat off !

Flitting

MM:   We moved to, it was at Ardler, Donald ?  It was Ardler, and that's where Donny was born, well we was, I was in a nursing home in Alyth that Don was born.  And then we went, was it round about Forfar, Don, mind, we went to Ascurry.

DM :  Carlingwell.

MM:  And Ascurry and then we went to Carlingwell and we went to East Adamson, that was just between Muirhead, and then, we mind, we went across to Fife, wasn't it ?

DM:  Glendoick.

MM:  And Glendoick, aye.  It was a wee while, aye aye.

INT :  And what made you keep moving ?

MM:  Well, the time of the War, mind, Don ?

DM :  It was a common thing.  The farm workers only bide six months.  And moved, like ken for better conditions.

MM:  Will wasnae happy out at Forfar, mind, Don ?  And he had to apply for permission to get leave to leave, you ken, but he got it.  He won his case.

DM:  During the war, standstill.

MM:  Aye, it was a standstill. 

DM:  You couldn't move unless you had permission.

MM: Aye.

INT:   And how did you feel about packing up ?

MM:  There was once, mind, Don, oh no you'll no mind, we killed the pig on the Saturday, Anne, and we'd  a wee pig in a poke, and this pig in the barrel and then the Monday morning we flitted, and it was pouring with rain, and I can aye mind, we flitted to Carlingwell.  Aye.  But I can aye mind this wee piggy ! 

 


Translation into standard English

Moving house

MM:  We moved to, was it Ardler, Donald ?  It was Ardler, and that's where Donny was born, well we were, I was, it was in a nursing home in Alyth that Don was born.  And then we went, was it round about Forfar, Don, remember, we went to Ascurry.

DM : Carlingwell.

MM:  And Ascurry and then we went to Carlingwell and we went to East Adamson, that was just between Muirhead, and then, we remember, we went across to Fife, wasn't it ?

DM:  Glendoick.

MM:  And Glendoick, yes.  It was a little while, yes, yes.

INT:  And what made you keep moving ?

MM:  Well, the time of the War, remember, Don ?

DM :  It was a common thing.  The farm workers only stayed six months.  And moved, you know, for better conditions.

MM:  Will wasn't happy out at Forfar, remember,  Don ?  And he had to apply for permission to get leave to leave, you know, but he got it.  He won his case.

DM:  During the war, standstill.

MM:  Yes, it was a standstill. 

DM:  You couldn't move unless you had permission.

MM:  Yes.

INT:  And how did you feel about packing up ?

MM:  There was once, remember, Don, oh no you wouldn't remember, we killed the pig on the Saturday, Anne, and we had a small pig in a sack, and this pig in the barrel and then on Monday morning we moved house, and it was pouring with rain, and I can always remember, we moved to Carlingwell.  Yes.  But I can always remember this little piggy !

 

 

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