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Ringing Recovery

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01 Dec 2011 23:22 #439 by Barry C
Ringing Recovery was created by Barry C
A female Siskin that was ringed in Abernyte on 01-Apr-2011 has been found at Moy near Inverness. The finding was made on 15-Jul-2011 which is 105 days after it was ringed. The distance between Abernyte and Moy, as the Siskin flies, is 115 km!

Barry

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11 Dec 2011 15:35 #441 by Barry C
Replied by Barry C on topic Ringing Recovery
In order to help in finding out more about the movements and behaviour of Starlings, some of these birds have been colour ringed at Montrose. So far the only recoveries have been to the north. If you see any Starlings, do please try and look for the presence of colour rings on the legs. The ringed birds will have a metal ring + a colour one on the right leg and two colour rings on the left. Please try and record the combination and let me know if you see any. In order to record them I need to know the location, the date and the combination of rings. Each bird has a unique combination of rings, so it could, for example, be right metal over white and left dark green over pink, as in the close up photograph.

Let’s see if any of these birds are around locally!

Thanks

Barry

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19 Sep 2012 22:10 #529 by Barry C
Replied by Barry C on topic Ringing Recovery
An adult male Siskin, that was ringed in Abernyte 13-Mar-2012, was found near Åna-Sira, Rogaland, Norway on 13-May-2012. This is on the South west corner of the Norwegian coast about half way between Stavanger and Kristiansand. A distance of 613 Km and 61 days apart.

Unlike the last Siskin ring recovered (near Inverness), this bird was caught alive and released, so may be it will be back again this winter?


Barry

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01 Mar 2013 23:20 - 01 Mar 2013 23:45 #554 by Barry C
Replied by Barry C on topic Ringing Recovery
Over the winter we have been ringing a lot of Siskins, so we have the possibility of birds crossing the North Sea to Norway again (see previous posting where one of our birds was found in the south of Norway). I will post any new recoveries that are reported.

During the last month some familiar friends – listed below- have turned up as recaptures at our ringing sessions. It is interesting that, unlike the Siskins, these species are more likely to remain local, evidently staying within a radius of a few miles.


Species.........Date previously caught........Age

Chaffinch......25/ 03/11..............................Adult
Coal Tit.........26/10/11...............................Hatched in 2011
Blue Tit.........17/02/11 &............................Hatched in 2010
.....................22/03/12...............................Adult
Blue Tit.........05/03/11................................Hatched in 2010


One of the Blue Tits has now been caught a total of three times, and is approaching 3 years old! For a Blue tit, a typical lifespan is 3 years, and the maximum recorded age is, 9 years 9 months 2 days.

Barry
Last edit: 01 Mar 2013 23:45 by Barry C.

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29 Jul 2013 11:46 #596 by Barry C
Replied by Barry C on topic Ringing Recovery
Not quite a ringing recovery I know but read on. I have been ringing with a colleague over the winter who is working on Tree Sparrows. She has been ringing them and collecting a sample for DNA analysis as well as the normal ringing and taking biometrics.
The analysis is now going well and one interesting DNA match has been found. Other people have been doing a similar analysis in other populations of Tree Sparrows, and a match to one of the Abernyte birds has come to light. Do you remember that Siskin that we ringed and was them found in Norway, well it is Norway that the DNA match fits.
If we are finding these Norwegian Scottish migrants, just think how many birds must be crossing the North Sea each year?

Barry

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22 Feb 2014 18:16 #639 by Barry C
Replied by Barry C on topic Ringing Recovery
We recently ringed some Long-Tailed Tits in the garden. These birds are interesting because they go round in groups, most of which will be related to each other in some way, a mixture of parents, last years young, and other members of an extended family group. The birds that we ringed are still around in the garden, and we have seen them a few times now. Tonight we watched the whole group getting ready to roost for the night, and it was a delight to watch them and have a good long view of them. Most times when I have been watching Long-Tailed Tits you get a couple of minutes of watching at most, before they move on to the next place to feed.
If you spot the ringed birds we’d be interested to know where else they get to on their round! The best way to find Long-Tailed Tits is to hear the contact calls that the birds use all the time to keep the group together.
You can see images and listen to the contact calls on the RSPB web page
www.rspb.org.uk/wildlife/birdguide/name/...tailedtit/index.aspx

Good watching and listening.

Barry

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